Finnish food supposedly looks like "shit" (imgur.com)

{Finland}

140 ups - 27 downs = 113 votes

133 comments submitted at 17:10:15 on May 13, 2014 by ljkp

  • [-]
  • iterable
  • -5 Points
  • 18:58:56, 13 May

As a Fin who has never left the States nor been around any other Fins I would try each one of those and have heard many good things about the pancakes from my sis who went to a Finnish camp. *Edit Well thanks for the support trying to embrace my Finnish heritage with the flaming and anger it appears to have caused. From now on I will use BSD instead of Linux in protest over your insane take of the world. Here we are all children of the Internet and I tell you this GET OFF MY INTERNETS!!

  • [-]
  • saatananmamu
  • 22 Points
  • 19:55:55, 13 May

> As a Fin who has never left the States

Is..isn't that a contradiction?

  • [-]
  • Tempehst
  • 16 Points
  • 20:46:37, 13 May

He meant he has a Fin. Genetic mutation.

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  • iterable
  • 4 Points
  • 20:10:10, 13 May

I could say Fin by heritage is that better? In the US we tend to label ourselves by where our families came from. Most do not identify with being from the US unless you are Native American or have no idea where your family came from.

  • [-]
  • saatananmamu
  • 8 Points
  • 21:41:15, 13 May

> I could say Fin by heritage is that better?

Not really, it's still pretty confusing and inaccurate. I believe you mean American with Finnish heritage.

  • [-]
  • delicious_cheese
  • 18 Points
  • 20:39:25, 13 May

You grew up in America. Your heritage is irrelevant. You are American.

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  • Tempehst
  • 2 Points
  • 20:49:09, 13 May

My kids are Finnish from birth, but were born in America, so they're Finnish-American with dual passports.

However, there is a town near by me that is full of descendents of Finnish immigrants who came here in the 19th century. They still speak (some) Finnish and consider themselves "Finnish," though they have a very odd idea of what Finland is like (religious and rural). Heritage isn't relevant to Americans: your heritage determines things like whether or not you open presents Christmas Eve or Christmas morning, what you eat for various holiday dinners, etc.

  • [-]
  • delicious_cheese
  • 11 Points
  • 20:56:23, 13 May

Everything you just said doesnt mean shit. If you grow up in America, surrounded by American culture, speaking American English and adopting American concepts, values and culture - you are American.

Americans and Australians both like to think of themselves in this self important, egotistical way. "Im not like them. Im different. Im half irish, quarter german, quarter mexican. My grandma spoke spanish and i know a half dozen words, so im clearly special".

Bullshit. You are American (or Australian, in the case of my example).

Im a dual citizen of Australia, with an Australian and Finnish passport. I am a lot of things, but Australian is not one of them.

  • [-]
  • Tempehst
  • 4 Points
  • 21:11:38, 13 May

I think you fail to understand multi-culturalism. And your host country rubs off on you a lot more than you appreciate.

  • [-]
  • delicious_cheese
  • 13 Points
  • 21:19:41, 13 May

I understand completely, but a multicultural American who grew up in America is still American. They still possess a majority of American traits, values and attributes.

Much like Australians who are just as, if not moreso, multicultural.

I have 2 Australian cousins who were adopted from Korea. They are korean by birth and genetics. Their adoptive father (my uncle by marriage) is 1st generation Australian, whos parents were from Italy. Their mother (my aunt by blood) is Finnish, who's parents were Finnish and Swedish.

You know what all this multiculturalism boils down to on my cousin's end?

They are Australians, who speak Australian English and possess Australian cultural, societal and political values.

Why?

Because they grew up in Australia.

Do you think accents are some form of genetic mutation?

  • [-]
  • Tempehst
  • 3 Points
  • 21:28:45, 13 May

No, but I do think that culture helps make up someone's identity. Many people are born in America, but still see themselves as having a different cultural identity due to living in immigrant enclaves. See Chinese-Americans or Japanese-Americans. Until laws were changed and they were allowed to assimilate, their identities were more Chinese than American. Unlike more recent immigrants, whose children more quickly come to identify with American culture and form more of an American identity.

Passports and language also form a huge part of how people identify themselves. I read a book about growing up trilingually, where this couple's children were growing up speaking English (parents lived in NYC), Swiss French (father was Swiss), and Chinese (mother was Chinese). But they kids ended up identifying more as Swiss than Chinese because they had Swiss passports (as well as American) but didn't have Chinese passports, so ended up feeling more foreign in China and having more negative attitudes about China (one complained to his mom that Chinese are loud, rude and China is dirty, which really distressed her). They liked more how clean, orderly and polite Switzerland was.

Identity and culture are very intertwined. For myself, I tell everyone I'm blah-American. My ancestors came to the US so long ago (and were all from Northern Europe and Britain, anyway) that it doesn't matter. My culture is mainstream American culture with nothing that really deviates from the norm. Someone whose family came from Russia a few generations ago would feel very differently, however.

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  • iterable
  • -6 Points
  • 21:35:48, 13 May

So true I know people born in China town NYC and lived there all there life and never become part of another culture.

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  • iterable
  • -10 Points
  • 21:29:53, 13 May

I would say New Englander before American. America is a idea, not what I am. Try and tell someone from Texas they are American for example even. We are of our states or regions. Saying American is like calling any one from Europe only European and not from country of origin.

  • [-]
  • saatananmamu
  • 9 Points
  • 21:45:45, 13 May

What are you on about? The US is a nation with its own unique history, cultural values, and language. It's as legitimate an identity as any other nation's. I don't understand it when Americans think their identity is somehow not "enough" of a real identity so they have to start using other nations' and cultures' labels despite having zero present ties to those places.

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  • iterable
  • -6 Points
  • 22:34:10, 13 May

Because if you have ever lived in America aka US cause america could mean both continents but I get what you are saying you would see we are a ever changing place. Right now I have Vietnamese, Chinese, and Albanians with in yelling distance and they would not call them selves American. American by idea only.

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  • Darth_Tier
  • 4 Points
  • 10:17:47, 14 May

I lived in the states for over 20 years. I never once thought of myself as anything beyond American.

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  • Darth_Tier
  • 5 Points
  • 10:14:05, 14 May

If you told a Texan he was American he would reply with, "No shit."

  • [-]
  • GrumpyFinn
  • 4 Points
  • 10:19:11, 14 May

Seriously. Texans are the most likely to be like FUCK YEAH IM AMERICAN!

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  • DnBb
  • 3 Points
  • 13:08:51, 14 May

Who is the Texan in r/Finland that you upset? I would only add a Yeehaw! to that but yeah, spot on. Here's an upvote.

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  • Finnish_Jager
  • 2 Points
  • 03:16:06, 15 May

I live in Texas. But I'm not upset ;D

  • [-]
  • delicious_cheese
  • 11 Points
  • 21:38:54, 13 May

You think that because you are an American. An insider, looking out, who has an inflated opinion of their individuality.

Outsiders looking in, see you as an American. No matter how special you think you are - When you come over here as a tourist, you are "just another american". The subtle differences between you and a Texan are as unapparent to us as would be the differences between someone from north and south china to you.

Most Europeans cant even tell the difference between the different American accents, letalone the minute cultural differences between someone from new york and someone from california. Moreover, European nations are different to American states. They each have thousands of years of their own culture, history, laws and most importantly - their own languages. Language literally changes the way you think.

You are American. It is not some kind of affliction that you should be ashamed of. Its who you are. Embrace it, dont try and muddy it because you want to be special - Because you arent.

  • [-]
  • iterable
  • -11 Points
  • 22:27:52, 13 May

"European nations are different to American states". This shows you are either a troll or just ignorant of geography. Also I am in the majority here this is fact we do not see our selves as "Americans" your PR news media is just as bad as ours and seem to be sipping the cool aid. States are more like nations we each have our own laws and rules and just like the EU share some rules and money of course.

  • [-]
  • Beeristheanswer
  • 7 Points
  • 08:05:05, 14 May

Also holidays, language, leadership, constitution, basic laws etc.

People dislike it when you start off a sentence with "as a Fin[n]" when you haven't got the slightest clue of the world through the eyes of a Finn. You haven't even been to Finland! You can't speak "as a Finn".

  • [-]
  • DnBb
  • 5 Points
  • 10:02:35, 14 May

European nations ARE different than American states. How the fuck could you argue otherwise?

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  • iterable
  • -4 Points
  • 11:50:52, 14 May

My State has more people in it than most European nations. If you know how the US government works we are a alliance of States not one. What makes a European nation different than a State is language mostly. Though in the US most states speak more than one language but you wouldnt know that.

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  • DnBb
  • 2 Points
  • 12:15:56, 14 May

> Though in the US most states speak more than one language but you wouldnt know that.

You're right I wouldn't know that. Because it's utter bullshit. Your "state" is delusion. The 51st state. Where the motto is: "I can argue anything no matter how obviously wrong I am, never back down" State bird: the Mindless Tit. State fish: anything with a Fin, those are my people.

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  • [-]
  • GrumpyFinn
  • 1 Points
  • 12:43:45, 14 May

Holy fuck. You can't be serious. You're some kind of troll. Please be a troll and npt an actual human who actually thinks like this.

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  • TwilightCampfighter
  • 7 Points
  • 23:33:26, 13 May

Goddamnit. I was going to submit this to /r/shitamericanssay until I saw there's a new rule that comments must be upvoted above +10 before you can submit them there.

  • [-]
  • DnBb
  • 2 Points
  • 13:11:12, 14 May

How do we make this happen? The world needs to see this display of stupidity.

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  • iterable
  • -6 Points
  • 23:57:29, 13 May

I am not a continent. Calling us americans hell people of the US calling them selves american is stupid. If anything would it not be north americans? I mean Europe is at least one continent and makes calling someone European. Hell I know Mexicans that get pissed when people internationally only see american as people from the US.

  • [-]
  • GrumpyFinn
  • 9 Points
  • 03:12:58, 14 May

Look, dude.
This is something you won't accept until you leave America, which you clearly haven't.
I grew up my entire life being told I was Italian, because both of my grandmothers and one grandfather were born there, despite me not speaking any Italian and my surname being German. When I came to Europe, everyone laughed at me for trying to defend myself. But I've been here long enough to realize that they're all right. I'm an American with Italian grandparents who has lived all over the US and now calls Finland home. Shit, even when I get my citizenship here, most native Finns won't even see me as Finnish.
But let's look at it like this - I'm pregnant now. His dad is Finnish, so he'll be half Finnish by blood, and the other half my weird Euro mix. I'm sure we'll eventually visit the US as a family, maybe he'll spend some summers with his grandparents. ...but he'll only really be American based on his dual citizenship. We'll speak Finnish at home, he'll go to Finnish schools. We'll celebrate Finnish holidays...because we live here. You've never even visited here, how do you know you even want to be Finnish?
Now, it's different if your lineage is very clear - one of your parents was born in Finland, you grew up speaking Finnish, etc. But any further down and it's just messy.
Plus, you keep saying Fin. It's Finn. That's actually a little embarrassing.

More Comments - Not Stored
  • [-]
  • DnBb
  • 3 Points
  • 10:28:32, 14 May

I'm American. I was born and raised there. I hold Finnish and US citizenship, live in Finland, and have a Finnish mother. To everyone I meet here I'm American. I look Finnish, speak intermediate Finnish w/ virtually no accent, but I will still always be considered American here. In the states I grew up doing Finnish holidays, eating Finnish food, going to Finland every summer, and suffered bouts of my mother blaring ABBA and Eino Grön(not at the same time) on the hi-fi while drinking wine and cleaning the house. I identified as American with Finnish heritage because it was part of my everyday life. I get why, historically, people in the US identify with the country of their immigrant parents but when it goes past parents then the connection is ONLY heritage. Heritage does NOT mean you are an honorary citizen of a country it just means you have relatives who were from there. This idea that you are from a country because you have some heritage might go unchallenged in the states but in the rest of the world this concept is a fucking joke, on you!

And wtf man, "Fin", are you fucking serious? You lost all credibility with that one mistake.

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  • delicious_cheese
  • 2 Points
  • 06:03:12, 14 May

This is outright the STUPIDEST thing anyone has EVER said to me on the fucking internet.

What the actual fuck? Do you know Anything? Did ANYTHING i said even manage to penetrate the back of your eyeballs and get to your soft and squishy little brain?

  • [-]
  • DnBb
  • 3 Points
  • 09:16:46, 14 May

So you're saying US states are the equivalent to countries in Europe? Keep digging that hole.

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  • GrumpyFinn
  • 6 Points
  • 02:58:34, 14 May

....what's a Fin?

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  • iterable
  • -10 Points
  • 03:01:58, 14 May

Shorter more efficient version us none born in Finland use to ID people from or of Finnish heritage.

  • [-]
  • GrumpyFinn
  • 16 Points
  • 03:16:55, 14 May

No. That's Finn. Fin is what fish have.

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  • DnBb
  • 6 Points
  • 09:11:12, 14 May

Yeah cause who has time to add another 'n' to that word? Is "none born" anything like unborn? "Fin" is just NOT how people in the states ID people with Finnish heritage. Stop talking shit.

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  • Biiviz
  • 7 Points
  • 19:11:46, 13 May

Wh- What do you do in a Finnish camp?

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  • iterable
  • -2 Points
  • 19:30:10, 13 May

Eat Pannukakku, sit in a sauna, and talk about finding more Fins I gather. I live in Massachusetts and not near were most Fins set up shop. So only Fins I know are family. My sis found a camp in that area where there is a bunch of Fins but numbers are falling so they have been reaching out a lot. I have been invited to go but its usually morning events on weekends I tend to sleep late.

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  • Elukka
  • 14 Points
  • 19:56:37, 13 May

I doubt it that you're a real Finn if you can't even spell 'Finn'.

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  • iterable
  • -15 Points
  • 20:12:24, 13 May

I don't doubt you either I am part Irish also. Also real Fin would that be light or dark Fin?

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  • FinFihlman
  • 8 Points
  • 21:41:44, 13 May

You are no Finn. Yes offense.

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  • iterable
  • -6 Points
  • 22:29:43, 13 May

Depending on the Fin I could say the same as some come from central Asia does that make them Asian not Fin?

  • [-]
  • DnBb
  • 4 Points
  • 09:12:48, 14 May

Is english your first language cause you suck at it. I am getting a headache trying to understand what-in-the-fuck you are trying to communicate.

  • [-]
  • FinFihlman
  • 2 Points
  • 04:18:49, 14 May

If a person with Finnis ancestry has lived his whole life in central Asia then fuck yeah, he's a Finn! Don't you see, Asians are superior to Muricans and as such have special privileges.

  • [-]
  • KotkaJouni
  • 0 Points
  • 10:32:06, 14 May

I wonder why people seem to take such offense from your comments. Although I do understand why many don't like the American way of flaunting your heritage even if you wouldn't know anything about it (I'm not saying you're like that, but many seem to be).

Don't worry man, many also think it's cool how the American Finns are fascinated by their heritage.

  • [-]
  • saatananmamu
  • 5 Points
  • 12:25:37, 14 May

>I wonder why people seem to take such offense from your comments.

Because it comes from pure ignorance and a willfully narrow limited perspective. He clearly doesn't give a shit about the perspectives and viewpoints of others or how his might be offensive or insulting. There's a massive difference between saying you have x heritage vs. saying you are x despite having zero affiliation with x. Have you even read any of his comments? He denies that his nationality is even real and equates the 50 states as being as distinct from each other as European countries. Dude is straight-up retarded and/or delusional.

  • [-]
  • DnBb
  • 2 Points
  • 13:35:26, 14 May

This. So much this.