Cows Kicked, Stabbed and Dragged at DiGiorno Pizza Cheese Supplier (youtube.com)

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3057 ups - 1366 downs = 1691 votes

770 comments submitted at 02:39:41 on Dec 11, 2013 by Reddit_User_11

  • [-]
  • limbodog
  • 501 Points
  • 02:43:19, 11 December

The lives of 99% of the animals we eat are short and brutish. Unless you know your farmer, assume this is the case.

  • [-]
  • dangoodspeed
  • 288 Points
  • 09:24:06, 11 December

The pork packaging at my neighborhood grocery market has a smiling pig giving a thumbs up. That's how you know they take proper care of their animals. Pigs never lie.

  • [-]
  • Oznog99
  • 7 Points
  • 11:13:35, 11 December

http://www.weebls-stuff.com/songs/Pork/

  • [-]
  • pshkn1
  • 5 Points
  • 11:44:27, 11 December

This sounds like Franz Ferdinand

  • [-]
  • ILikeLampz
  • 1 Points
  • 14:03:28, 11 December

Is that an infinite loop? I made it through 3 repeats before I needed to get back to work.

  • [-]
  • LNMagic
  • 1 Points
  • 14:14:03, 11 December

Everything I've seen from weebls-stuff is infinite loop. Badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger badger

  • [-]
  • Theabgry
  • 2 Points
  • 14:17:27, 11 December

Mushroom mushroom

  • [-]
  • FearlessObserver
  • 5 Points
  • 12:52:44, 11 December

Pigs never lie and that's why they are more equal.

  • [-]
  • senorGAYchang
  • 29 Points
  • 11:17:52, 11 December

In England we have a brand of sweets ("candy") called 'Percy Pigs' which are marketed to kids... Aaaaand they're made out of pig gelatin.

  • [-]
  • schvince
  • 41 Points
  • 12:41:09, 11 December

most gummybears over the world are made with pig gelatin.

  • [-]
  • D3adkl0wn
  • 29 Points
  • 13:12:03, 11 December

most gummy candy in general is

  • [-]
  • electrodan
  • 10 Points
  • 14:53:41, 11 December

Will you two stop saying "gummi" so much?

/Marge

  • [-]
  • HUMOROUSGOAT
  • 1 Points
  • 17:17:25, 11 December

This is true, Fruit by the foot, and fruit rollups do not have gelatin in the ingredients, if anyone is looking for an alternative.

  • [-]
  • D3adkl0wn
  • 1 Points
  • 17:19:15, 11 December

you can actually get pectin based vegan friendly gummy candy sometimes too. You just have to read a lot of ingredients.

  • [-]
  • gamman
  • 6 Points
  • 13:54:24, 11 December

If most people have seen how gelatin is made, they would not eat it!! Never seen it made from pigs, but seen it made from cattle. By far, the worst smelling factory I have ever worked in.

  • [-]
  • Misterj4y
  • 1 Points
  • 14:03:18, 11 December

I've seen how its made. Gelatin food is delicious.

  • [-]
  • gamman
  • 1 Points
  • 14:15:34, 11 December

The thing that used to gross me out, was the raw material. I remember working on some gear in the raw end of a gelatin factory once, it was already full. A trucked turned up full of cattle skins and just dumped it out in the hot sun. It sat there for the best part of 2 days before they dumped into the hoppers. The smell, so bad. Funny though, at the other end, one of the cleanest places ever.

  • [-]
  • algoritm
  • 1 Points
  • 18:46:21, 11 December

WHAT?! I thought they were made of bear gelatin! Never eating them agin.

  • [-]
  • senorGAYchang
  • 0 Points
  • 16:05:26, 11 December

Yeah but they're 'bears' not 'pigs'. I just find it quite unwholesome that something as innocent as candy has some morbid reality behind the name.

  • [-]
  • southernmost
  • 6 Points
  • 13:34:38, 11 December

Pretty much all gelatin is made from pigs. Including Jell-O.

  • [-]
  • senorGAYchang
  • 1 Points
  • 16:06:35, 11 December

I don't doubt, but I just find it quite dark that there's some morbid truth behind the name of a type of candy.

  • [-]
  • gamman
  • 1 Points
  • 13:54:56, 11 December

most gelatin is made from cattle.

  • [-]
  • fenney
  • 8 Points
  • 11:19:54, 11 December

But they're so tasty.

  • [-]
  • senorGAYchang
  • 7 Points
  • 11:34:10, 11 December

I know... Possibly the best sweets ever. Have you tried the veggie ones though? Slightly different but just as good I reckon.

  • [-]
  • small_horse
  • 1 Points
  • 11:55:35, 11 December

Freakin' expensive though - could always get the knock off ones from Tesco (Monkeys?), ASDA (Monkeys) or Sainsburys (Elephants)

  • [-]
  • vainamo-
  • 1 Points
  • 14:31:55, 11 December

There's nothing wrong with gelatin, is there?

  • [-]
  • senorGAYchang
  • 1 Points
  • 16:09:13, 11 December

Not really, it just seems a little sombre and morbid to advertise a child candy brand with a little piggy mascot, when the kids are, in fact, eating the piggy in question.

  • [-]
  • thebeefytaco
  • 1 Points
  • 18:30:40, 11 December

Jello is made from animal bones and hide.

  • [-]
  • panicattackdog
  • 1 Points
  • 13:04:57, 11 December

There's a butcher shop in my hometown with a mural out front depicting a smiling pig chasing a woman with a knife. Does that mean it's good or bad?

Also, no, I'm not making that up.

  • [-]
  • S4nderr
  • 1 Points
  • 14:37:54, 11 December

This is hilarious but true.

  • [-]
  • whatevers_clever
  • 1 Points
  • 15:46:43, 11 December

4 legs good, 2 legs bad

  • [-]
  • likeabosslikeaboss
  • 0 Points
  • 13:59:26, 11 December

http://www.tittiesnbacon.com/

  • [-]
  • fregu149
  • 16 Points
  • 15:17:22, 11 December

99%? Do you have any backing for that figure at all? Here in Sweden the lives of cows are very good. The regulations are very very strict and we have laws that forbid to many cows in one single place.

  • [-]
  • JimmyDThing
  • 0 Points
  • 17:12:12, 11 December

How much does it cost at market and are you actually buying beef that's been raised in your country? Are there subsidies that help pay farmers to keep this practice in order to keep the price down so people can actually afford it?

  • [-]
  • nysmoln
  • 1 Points
  • 19:47:53, 11 December

We Swedes have expensive meat because of this. Filet mignon costs about $65/kilo for Swedish meat and about $35 for imported American. Brazilian frozen crap costs about $25

  • [-]
  • PeedgeMcDuck
  • 9 Points
  • 13:47:09, 11 December

Not me. I get all my meat from a local farm that I am free to visit at any time.

  • [-]
  • marxisthunter
  • 35 Points
  • 13:38:44, 11 December

I volunteer at a local slaughterhouse and have witnessed how ordinary workers treat animals. Abuse cases like this are actually very rare.

  • [-]
  • gottaluva911
  • 19 Points
  • 14:38:40, 11 December

> I volunteer at a local slaughterhouse...

Who the fuck volunteers at a slaughterhouse? Why?

  • [-]
  • grackychan
  • 22 Points
  • 15:29:32, 11 December

Experience if he wants to go into butchery?

  • [-]
  • AbanoMex
  • 1 Points
  • 16:20:33, 11 December

Someone needed a butcher?

  • [-]
  • eraserhill
  • 7 Points
  • 16:34:08, 11 December

boy loves his meat.

  • [-]
  • magopus6
  • 2 Points
  • 14:53:46, 11 December

Free bacon.....gah!

  • [-]
  • g-gorilla-gorilla
  • 3 Points
  • 18:55:26, 11 December

Oh, so you're personally qualified to say how rare it is, nation-wide, because you have witnessed how ordinary workers act in one local slaughterhouse?

  • [-]
  • second_mouse
  • 1 Points
  • 19:45:43, 11 December

He's as qualified to say it as the parent commenter is qualified to say that abuse happens all the time. Maybe even more so because he at least has some experience in a slaughterhouse.

  • [-]
  • Ocean_Squeeze
  • -2 Points
  • 14:21:30, 11 December

This is a troll account and people are upvoting this. Just goes to show that people will listen to what they want to hear to hide from their conscience.

  • [-]
  • gibletor
  • 1 Points
  • 19:24:20, 11 December

I don't know, after reading his right-wing, wanna-be economist rantings, his near-constant ragging on people with autism, and his bragging about burning someone's possessions for breaking up with his friend, I don't really find it all that surprising that he would seek out work murdering animals for no pay.

  • [-]
  • DavidFuckingDuchovny
  • 0 Points
  • 15:01:31, 11 December

Maybe they were just rare at your local slaughterhouse?

  • [-]
  • twoodymc
  • 32 Points
  • 12:58:41, 11 December

I don't know how you came to this conclusion. Most farmers who don't supply to the giant companies wouldn't want their product to be stressed or live in terrible conditions as it would ruin the quality of the meat meaning they might lose business.

  • [-]
  • gibletor
  • 7 Points
  • 14:18:47, 11 December

Particularly in the US, the vast majority of livestock are raised in factory-like conditions for these giant companies.

  • [-]
  • joshclay
  • 9 Points
  • 13:47:26, 11 December

Can confirm. Grew up on a cattle farm in a rural farming community with thousands of farms in the area. Literally never seen a cow intentionally abused like video shows. 99% is bullshit sensationalism. I would say 99% would apply a lot more to animals who live in the wild than animals that live on farms.

  • [-]
  • vainamo-
  • 32 Points
  • 14:34:44, 11 December

Most of the world's meat does NOT come from happy rural farms like ours. It comes from factory farms where the animals are in tiny pens and not allowed to move. They are fed and given growth hormones to get them in, grown, and butchered. They are not humane like a pasture farm where the animals have freedom to roam and graze.

  • [-]
  • TheBloodening
  • 6 Points
  • 15:41:49, 11 December

Hmm grew up on farms and ranches and around the packing industry. My family has been in that business for four generations across Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico. I've worked with/for the five biggest packing houses in the United States. Most of my family has more than one degree in some kind of meat science from very credible universities. I'm not saying factory farms don't exist, I'm just agreeing with Joshclay above. 99% of these videos are sensationalism. If someone disagrees tell them to read the Jungle and get some perspective.

  • [-]
  • vainamo-
  • 0 Points
  • 16:39:57, 11 December

While I know that not ALL meat we eat from stores is raised cruelly, I know that a lot of it is, too, and we don't have any way of knowing which meat is or isn't.

Also, I think The Jungle is a great book, but is pretty outdated by now. Meat production has progressed (for better or worse) by leaps and bounds since it was written, and things could definitely be more, or less, cruel and unsanitary by now.

  • [-]
  • TheBloodening
  • 4 Points
  • 17:25:37, 11 December

A lot is just not true homie. I grew up all over those industries. My family comes out of the cradle onto a horse. You can tell if meat has been stressed, undernourished or mistreated by quality and even taste. They give college degrees on the subject. Not trying to come across as a no-it-all I've just been around this stuff my whole life. Its a bit of a tangent but please remember refrigerators are a very modern invention.

  • [-]
  • limbodog
  • 1 Points
  • 16:37:28, 11 December

This

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • -2 Points
  • 14:36:13, 11 December

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • gibletor
  • 3 Points
  • 15:57:59, 11 December

It is bullshit, but livestock raised in corporate run/owned/contracted farms account for over 50% of the US's meat production and rising, despite only accounting for around 5% of farms. In the US, the cattle industry is actually the biggest offender, with only four companies controlling well over 80% of the beef production - Tyson's, Cargill, ConAgra and JBS. Every single one of these companies has a documented history of animal abuse at their farms.

  • [-]
  • musicaficta
  • 1 Points
  • 16:54:22, 11 December

Those farmers can't supply meat to millions of people. Factory farms can. If they cared about integrity, and raised their animals in a non-industrial fashion, they wouldn't be able to meet the demands of the people.

  • [-]
  • transmigrant
  • 1 Points
  • 18:03:31, 11 December

S/He came to it because most meat doesn't come from local family farms.

  • [-]
  • gmooa
  • 29 Points
  • 03:27:48, 11 December

Sadly, you are correct. We should be able to do better.

  • [-]
  • 2waggerjagger
  • -23 Points
  • 06:34:12, 11 December

Personally you shouldn't judge unless your a farmer. with such a large operation and cow being really stupid animals they find all sorts of ways to hurt themselves especially with all the machinery and if a cow becomes sick it has to be moved it would have been cruel to kill it on the spot and drag it away. What they didn't show was the vets they have taking care of the sick and injured ones. This is what farmers face on a daily basis and if your a farmer you know shit just happens sometimes. Yes I'm a farmer!

  • [-]
  • Kim-Hwang-sik
  • 28 Points
  • 10:25:05, 11 December

I have to be a farmer to judge whipping and stabbing cows?

  • [-]
  • CANOODLING_SOCIOPATH
  • -13 Points
  • 11:21:55, 11 December

When the choice is either to kill the cow (which is quite wasteful as they are meant for milk), or to whip it to get it to move which do you choose?

  • [-]
  • rawbface
  • 8 Points
  • 13:39:31, 11 December

Talk about a false dichotomy.

  • [-]
  • dustlesswalnut
  • 4 Points
  • 13:38:17, 11 December

Surely there must be a third choice.

  • [-]
  • sonicboom21
  • 8 Points
  • 11:11:54, 11 December

Maybe I'm being judgmental. But you sound like one of those turds that do these cruel things to animals.

  • [-]
  • nomanoid
  • 1 Points
  • 11:53:56, 11 December

Interesting. I always thought giraffes were the dumb ones.

  • [-]
  • dudermax
  • -11 Points
  • 08:16:44, 11 December

thank you. so many people have no idea what they are talking about.

  • [-]
  • deerchild
  • 29 Points
  • 10:12:12, 11 December

Don't excuse the cruelty because of the environment the animal lives in. My uncle, a dairy farmer on the west coast of Ireland discussed this with me one day.

His attitude is, on the super scale of many industrial farms (particularly non pasture fed) there is no existence of nature for these animals; how then can we let them exist an animals when they spend their lives as prisoners. Tortured through all their years. Even if an animal isn't intelligent, it still has emotions and suffers pain. It has instinct which is counter to the life they experience.

As long as there is a boundary between the life of an animal and the meat that you buy; people are willing to avoid the truth. Unless they just don't care, in which case they have no empathy for the animal and lack something in their heart.

As long as the meat is cheap and it comes free of blood; people will look past the suffering of the animal, because to them its not an animal, its just meat.

  • [-]
  • dudermax
  • 1 Points
  • 17:46:27, 11 December

It's funny how meat has become a thing. I can't even talk to people about butchering meat. They get uncomfortable, but they would eat it if it was cooked and in front of them.

  • [-]
  • nomanoid
  • 0 Points
  • 11:52:27, 11 December

But I don't eat cows, I eat steaks!

  • [-]
  • Juggernaut78
  • 0 Points
  • 12:22:40, 11 December

There are just some people in the world that think you can go just pick up a fucking one ton cow!!! Or that if a cow is hurt it will move itself without whipping the shit out of it.

Please stupid people how do you propose to move cows when they don't want to? If Anyone has a good answer I'm sure the farmers will start using it. Farmers love their animals, don't believe this sensational bullshit that they don't.

Oh and you better quit buying digorno pizza because it was definately their fault. That's like the dumbasses that quit buying Ford vehicles because of a bad batch of Firestone tires.

  • [-]
  • Unwanted_Commentary
  • 0 Points
  • 12:04:23, 11 December

Poor grammar. Confirmed farmer.

  • [-]
  • Godfreeshawn
  • -37 Points
  • 07:04:19, 11 December

Fuck you

  • [-]
  • EverydayImlurkinit
  • 7 Points
  • 08:23:05, 11 December

Hey fucktard scroll up and read /u/brirober's link before hating. I had no idea about what a downed cow was, what it means for the cow, and what the steps to take to save that cow.

  • [-]
  • crotch_protein
  • 1 Points
  • 09:44:20, 11 December

lol

  • [-]
  • calidoode714
  • 0 Points
  • 10:40:57, 11 December

Where at?

  • [-]
  • abledoer
  • -10 Points
  • 09:46:50, 11 December

>your

  • [-]
  • DarthWarder
  • -6 Points
  • 11:23:56, 11 December

We should. And we could, simply by not eating this kind of meat more than once a year.

Other than that i don't see many options.

Most people don't realize that the main problem is that for the amount of nourishment we receive from the cow meat doesn't come close to the amount of resources that go into growing them (this applies to all meat, but cows especially).

Therefore we have to industrialize the production and cut every corner that would allow treating them humanely in order to turn a profit. If you want things to change you better be ready to pay 10x for cow meat, or you should stop eating it altogether.

  • [-]
  • simjanes2k
  • 6 Points
  • 11:48:37, 11 December

I'm not sure that pure efficiency is a good reason to make huge changes. Inhumane treatment of animals is, I'd agree. But I don't want to be told I can't have a Honeycrisp because Golden Delicious is 7.14% less demanding of water and acreage.

  • [-]
  • CupcakeMedia
  • 2 Points
  • 13:14:27, 11 December

How would we not eat this more than once a year though? What sort of social mechanics would we need to employ to achieve that?

  • [-]
  • DarthWarder
  • 0 Points
  • 14:08:05, 11 December

I'm no economist/framer, but reducing supply and (naturally)increasing the price would do the trick.

  • [-]
  • CupcakeMedia
  • 2 Points
  • 14:17:44, 11 December

Actually, speaking of farmers - how would you convince them to do that? It's asking someone to work marginally less for substantially less money. Actually, with the changes they need to make, they'd probably work harder than they have to.

I'm not saying that you're wrong on the whole, but it's practically impossible to go through with. Unless, I suppose, you make all the farms owned directly by the government, investing heavily into maintenance of the farms in order to reduce the production of this kind of meat, bypassing the issue of having to "not eat it more than once".

But that's communism or socialism or something or other. Media loves throwing shit at anything with those labels. It would never work out because apparently it was decided that governmentally owned things are inherently bad. Unless the government only gives tax cuts to that thing, because then it's being independent and therefore good.

There are a lot of social issues with this plan, basically.

  • [-]
  • DarthWarder
  • 1 Points
  • 14:28:10, 11 December

Yeah it would be hard on the farmers. Cow farmers would have to do some restructuring. But i come from a country where we don't even really eat cows because we use them for the milk mostly.

The only cow meat you can get is usually from the cows that get older and have to be cut down because they can't provide enough milk, and it still costs about 5x as much as it does in the US, but with 1/5 wages.

Restructuring isn't impossibly difficult/hard, unless you run a very specialized and inhumane "meat factory", in which case aren't those the things that we want to get rid of anyways?

And about the media side; it's their job to shout bullshit at the top of their lungs, that's what gets them the money. They are the people who condemn all the science and cancer statistics, let's keep using coal power plants because nuclear energy is so spooky and dangerous.

  • [-]
  • CupcakeMedia
  • 1 Points
  • 14:55:48, 11 December

Might be true, I don't know. But you can't ignore an aspect, just because it's full of bullshit.

Animals are being treated cruelly and that's a serious issue. So a serious approach to restructuring the way that the cattle farm industry works is needed. And media is going to be a part of the decision-making process, whether we like it or not, because they are the ones who are responsible for spreading information to the masses. In fact, their job (the news station job, anyway) is to spread news, not opinions.

With that in mind - a plan that involves a whole group (a large and important group) of people to change their ways through indirect social engineering is not going to work unless a large majority agree on the plan. With media being counter-productive to a plan like that, I will bet a large sum of money on the plan not working.

Otherwise some people might think that this plan is a good idea and go along with it, resulting in a strange sort of agnostic vegan. Vegetarians, on the whole, don't affect how many animals are killed each year by any substantial amount. At least, the amount of cows killed per day is still higher than 90k per day and I don't imagine that they like that.

So what you want to do is to affect the whole industry directly. My solution was to give farms to the government and get basic animal safety precautions and instructions that are taught out to farmers, with active monetary penalisation on not following the rules. This gives the farmers no choice but to agree. It's not ideal in the short term but should do at least some good on the whole, unfortunately raising prices on beef, causing many fast food chains to switch to more chicken oriented food. Which I suppose is fine. The prices still increase, but no longer as artificially.

Increasing the price of a product before doing anything else affects the industry indirectly because it's the distributors that pay the farmers, not consumers directly. What we would risk ending up with is a lot of shady meat, smaller amounts of it and conceivably worse quality. I'm not saying it wouldn't change something about how the farms work, and maybe change it to a more positive light. I just don't think that it would cause farmers to stop mistreating animals.

I suppose a "Steam" version for meat might work. Where you pay in the supermarket on your phone and a bar tells you how much of what you pay goes directly to the farmer and how much goes to the distributor. But again - the issue is animal cruelty. A side issue is meat accessibility and condition.

  • [-]
  • DarthWarder
  • 0 Points
  • 15:02:58, 11 December

I agree with most of your points, but i have a few things to say:

>So what you want to do is to affect the whole industry directly. My solution was to give farms to the government and get basic animal safety precautions and instructions that are taught out to farmers

Things like this are already in place, aren't they? Guidelines and laws that deal with how an animal should be raised, how much room it should have, with what method and in what condition it should be butchered. If these rules aren't being followed you get sick or otherwise defective animals.

All it would take is for these rules to be made more favorable for the animals, which would in return naturally raise the cost of production, driving up the price.

  • [-]
  • CupcakeMedia
  • 1 Points
  • 15:09:21, 11 December

Well, that's actually kinda why I want to give the government more control over it (whoa ...). I mean, an inspector wouldn't get everything and legal consequences won't scare everyone. But goddamn it I want to try and make life better for the animals, and the government is the only force I can think of that could deal in an effective manner with the issue.

It just needs to be prodded into action. And sensible and logical action. Preferably call Scandinavia and ask them for advice as you go along.

  • [-]
  • RomanCavalry
  • 1 Points
  • 13:43:52, 11 December

Or you can buy local.

  • [-]
  • DarthWarder
  • 0 Points
  • 14:01:55, 11 December

It still takes a lot of resources to grow as opposed to vegetables, or to some extent even birds.

  • [-]
  • randomlurkerr
  • 1 Points
  • 14:03:21, 11 December

This is true in America where corn I grown to feed cows. Elsewhere it's generally grass and it's not much of an issue. Feeding corn to cows isn't that good for them

  • [-]
  • javastripped
  • 2 Points
  • 18:38:56, 11 December

This is what I do.... 90% of my meat is bought directly from the farm. It's actually much cheaper ... I save about 40% on my meat because I buy a third of a cow and keep it in a freezer...

  • [-]
  • BigCat9000
  • 19 Points
  • 04:55:18, 11 December

It's all the more reason to not buy another DiGiorno pizza. Leaving aside the fact that they're overpriced and taste like shit, it's important to send a message that if companies work with suppliers that treat their animals like this then we won't be buying the end product. Simple as that. No one can regulate the suppliers more effectively than the companies whose business they are courting and they're not going to give a shit unless we make them.

  • [-]
  • Godisqueer
  • 31 Points
  • 10:51:01, 11 December

also, they're owned by Nestle. just another reason not to buy DiGiorno

*edit: whoever downvoted me - go do some research on Nestle

  • [-]
  • sublevel3
  • -2 Points
  • 11:52:05, 11 December

Interneters are lazy. Do it for him and link it.

  • [-]
  • Godisqueer
  • 4 Points
  • 12:11:54, 11 December

na. they'll just say the source is shit. then i'll get pissed and link another source... and so it will continue until i'm just left pissed

  • [-]
  • rathskellar
  • 1 Points
  • 13:36:18, 11 December

People can and should do their own research on this.

  • [-]
  • Salivation_Army
  • 34 Points
  • 07:30:31, 11 December

99% of meat and dairy in the country comes from suppliers that treat their animals like this, regardless of brand. That's OP's point.

  • [-]
  • electric_sandwich
  • 31 Points
  • 09:36:44, 11 December

Citation needed.

  • [-]
  • Salivation_Army
  • 16 Points
  • 10:30:07, 11 December

Eating Animals, Jonathan Safran Foer; Temple Grandin's animal welfare audits; US Department of Agriculture census 2002 (a bit old, but there have been no substantial changes in the meat or dairy industry since then).

  • [-]
  • Snoop_Dragon
  • 1 Points
  • 14:40:10, 11 December

Name dropping g some references does not equal a citation.

99% of farmed animals are not treated this way.

  • [-]
  • Pancake_Lizard
  • 15 Points
  • 15:03:08, 11 December

Citation needed.

  • [-]
  • musicaficta
  • 1 Points
  • 16:55:47, 11 December

Then what, pray, is a citation?

  • [-]
  • Snoop_Dragon
  • -2 Points
  • 17:42:29, 11 December

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/citation

in this case I am looking for an actual quote.

  • [-]
  • I_Drink_IPAs
  • 2 Points
  • 19:19:44, 11 December

What?

  • [-]
  • electric_sandwich
  • -8 Points
  • 10:33:50, 11 December

Right. 99%.

  • [-]
  • fgcpoo
  • -2 Points
  • 10:27:51, 11 December

Lol downvoted for asking for a source on a claim. GJ reddit.

  • [-]
  • electric_sandwich
  • -4 Points
  • 10:29:12, 11 December

Thought so.

  • [-]
  • musicaficta
  • 1 Points
  • 16:57:27, 11 December

Industrializing animals is animal cruelty. Perhaps not every farmer blatantly abuses his animals on camera, but the conditions in which 99% of animals in factory farms are kept are extremely cruel. There is no debating that.

  • [-]
  • electric_sandwich
  • 1 Points
  • 17:58:58, 11 December

This is your opinion and you are welcome to it, but "industrializing" is an incredibly vague and loaded term.

>Perhaps not every farmer blatantly abuses his animals on camera, but the conditions in which 99% of animals in factory farms are kept are extremely cruel. There is no debating that.

Really? Please tell me how exactly you came up with the figure of 99%. Also has "extremely cruel" suddenly become a term that everyone agrees means the exact same thing?

  • [-]
  • Moos_Mumsy
  • -2 Points
  • 13:08:00, 11 December

Go to the Mercy for Animals website. They have undercover videos of all kinds of factory farms. Cows, pigs, turkeys, chickens.... MFA provides the evidence without the histrionics of PETA. They're the Joe Friday of the animal welfare movement. Just the facts Ma'am, just the facts.

  • [-]
  • electric_sandwich
  • 2 Points
  • 13:12:49, 11 December

Undercover videos showing 99% of the industry?

  • [-]
  • thetimeisnow
  • -3 Points
  • 11:14:10, 11 December

"Farm to Fridge" , 12 minute video

http://www.mercyforanimals.org/farm-to-fridge.aspx

  • [-]
  • electric_sandwich
  • 0 Points
  • 11:16:49, 11 December

>99% of meat and dairy in the country comes from suppliers that treat their animals like this, regardless of brand.

Youtube videos don't count.

  • [-]
  • thetimeisnow
  • 0 Points
  • 11:51:21, 11 December

These are Standard Practices.

Narrated by Academy Award-nominee James Cromwell, this 12-minute, powerful film takes viewers on an eye-opening exploration behind the closed doors of the nation’s largest industrial poultry, pig, dairy and fish farms, hatcheries, and slaughter plants – revealing the often-unseen journey that animals make from Farm to Fridge

  • [-]
  • electric_sandwich
  • 0 Points
  • 11:55:36, 11 December

"standard practices" =!= 100% and an academy award winning narrator does absolutely nothing to provide any legitimacy at all for your youtube video. Go back and read what you wrote again. 99% where did this number come from?

  • [-]
  • thetimeisnow
  • -1 Points
  • 12:11:11, 11 December

You said youtube videos dont count, this is a video produced my Mercy For Animals and yes they have it on youtube. These are standard practices, have you watched the video? The video has been out for years now and this is just the way things are within the factory farming industry. These animals deserve so much more , just as you and I would never trade places with them.

If you need to see more there is a really powerful documentary, Earthlings

1 hr 35 minutes and this covers all aspects of animals being used by humanity

http://earthlings.com/?page_id=32

  • [-]
  • D_Mouse4
  • 6 Points
  • 13:02:14, 11 December

Yeah, I hear Mercy For Animals are a pretty impartial source on farming.

More Comments - Not Stored
  • [-]
  • electric_sandwich
  • 2 Points
  • 12:16:56, 11 December

99% is what you said. Not "standard practices" whatever in the hell that means.

More Comments - Not Stored
  • [-]
  • one-eleven
  • -4 Points
  • 13:24:12, 11 December

He wrote 99% conversationally, not as if he was submitting his thesis. I'm sorry you're not able to figure that out.

  • [-]
  • RomanCavalry
  • 8 Points
  • 13:48:24, 11 December

That isn't a good reason though. If someone wants to sway another for some reason and gives a statistic or absolute, they should provide it to further their point. Not doing so and saying "oh, its just conversational" just weakens the perspective.

More Comments - Not Stored
  • [-]
  • electric_sandwich
  • 3 Points
  • 14:31:06, 11 December

Oh I get it, conversational statistics.

  • [-]
  • CpnCornDogg
  • 1 Points
  • 14:34:13, 11 December

I dont even understand....like why! Whats the point of doing anything like this unless you are psychotic.

  • [-]
  • TheBloodening
  • 2 Points
  • 15:46:03, 11 December

LOL. OK there Upton. The meat industry is full of evil people that certainly haven't made HUGE advancements in the past 50 years especially compared to the rest of the world. Give me a break.

  • [-]
  • electric_sandwich
  • 4 Points
  • 10:38:56, 11 December

This works. Mcdonalds made huge changes in their supply chain after fast food nation came out.

  • [-]
  • thepensivepoet
  • 1 Points
  • 14:01:35, 11 December

Where exactly do you think your cheerio milk came from...?

  • [-]
  • Kinseyincanada
  • 1 Points
  • 15:40:07, 11 December

They already dropped them as a supplier

  • [-]
  • suninabox
  • 1 Points
  • 17:30:17, 11 December

There's almost certainly other food products you're eating that involve similar brutality it's just not been exposed yet.

It's a bit premature to be jumping on a high horse unless you've thoroughly investigated the conditions of every animal sourced food you buy.

  • [-]
  • mitchbrain
  • 0 Points
  • 09:10:49, 11 December

I like DiGiorno pizza, it's alright, depends on how long you cook it and how long it is in the freezer.

  • [-]
  • ManfredH
  • 2 Points
  • 12:26:19, 11 December

Making your own home made pizza isn't only surprisingly easy, it's not as time consuming as you'd think. And so much cheaper and better tasting.

The most important thing is having ingredients on hand and a bread machine.

  • [-]
  • 673_points
  • 3 Points
  • 12:36:38, 11 December

We just keep some premade pizza bases in the freezer. Convenience of frozen pizza meets fresh toppings and minimising time between not pizza and pizza. In my mouth

  • [-]
  • Bogey_Kingston
  • 4 Points
  • 14:26:08, 11 December

As someone who grew up around farmers his whole life, you are so wrong. Obviously, you don't know what you are talking about. You should edit your comment since you're the top because it's demonizong farmers for no reason.

  • [-]
  • Snoop_Dragon
  • 1 Points
  • 14:42:56, 11 December

But le Reddit Vegan army

  • [-]
  • sonneti
  • 6 Points
  • 12:00:27, 11 December

100% of animals lives are short and brutish whether we eat them or not

Edit: Unless you're a cat or a cute dog

  • [-]
  • Essar
  • 11 Points
  • 12:43:49, 11 December

It's not like some turtles live for a couple of hundred years or anything.

  • [-]
  • sonneti
  • 18 Points
  • 12:53:00, 11 December

lol I take it you've never seen the turtles mad dash for the sea once they've been born? Most of them don't make it because they get eaten by birds, many more getting eaten quickly in the sea. But yeah a few of these armored animals might live for a couple hundred years.

My point was in nature there aren't many animals dying of old age, everything gets eaten by something.

  • [-]
  • Snoop_Dragon
  • 5 Points
  • 14:41:25, 11 December

Everyone on reddit is a vegan now apparently

  • [-]
  • stayphrosty
  • 1 Points
  • 17:41:00, 11 December

you don't have to be a vegan to be disgusted by the sight of torture...

  • [-]
  • RomanCavalry
  • 0 Points
  • 13:45:06, 11 December

They were refuting your blanket statement of "100%". You spoke in absolutes so your statement was weak. That's what was being pointed out.

  • [-]
  • D_Mouse4
  • 5 Points
  • 13:05:46, 11 December

100% is a bit dramatic, but certainly somewhere near that made up 99% of animals live short brutish lives. 99% of those turtles that live for hundreds (not couple of hundreds) of years will die in the first few weeks of life. And pretty fucking brutishly.

  • [-]
  • Searth
  • 0 Points
  • 14:03:14, 11 December

Here is a comparison between lifespan in a farm and natural lifespan. The difference is pretty stunning. I know that in the wild lots of babies get eaten long before reaching their natural lifespan as well. The difference is that the wild predators don't have other options like we humans have.

  • [-]
  • PunksPrettyMuchDead
  • 2 Points
  • 16:34:59, 11 December

This is a list of farm animals, they're bred for farming and would most likely not live their complete lifespan in the wild either. Pekin ducks can't even fly, chickens are easy prey, turkeys can't even walk or fuck if they get big enough, and cows are dumb enough to walk in front of trains.

You can't compare these domesticated animals to their wild counterparts - wood ducks, wild turkeys, and buffalo are evolved for their environments, and they still don't die of old age.

  • [-]
  • TheBloodening
  • 3 Points
  • 15:50:06, 11 December

As someone who has raised livestock my whole life and comes from four generations as such. LOL. Yea you go find me a 10 year old wild pig. I'd love to see an 11 year old rabbit as well. So incredibility bias at either end. Thanks for the laugh though...

  • [-]
  • limbodog
  • 2 Points
  • 16:43:39, 11 December

How does raising livestock make you an expert on wildlife? Not dismissing your claim, just curious.

  • [-]
  • Cheese_Bits
  • -4 Points
  • 16:56:53, 11 December

It doesn't, it just makes it easier to ignore the truth.

  • [-]
  • TheBloodening
  • 1 Points
  • 17:29:27, 11 December

Or maybe I've had more experience than sitting behind a computer posting the "truth."

  • [-]
  • Cheese_Bits
  • -1 Points
  • 17:34:20, 11 December

Yep your experience with livestock means you're also a wildlife expert... Do you realize how ridiculous that sounds?

You and your 4 generations of farmers have a long line of biology degrees right? Sure thing hayseed.

  • [-]
  • TheBloodening
  • 0 Points
  • 17:37:22, 11 December

Clearly you didn't read my above response. Here let me put that foot in your mouth for you. "I've taken as much wildlife to eat as livestock raised. I'm from VERY rural parts of the US. Actually had venison for years before ever having beef. Not an expert just someone who's had to take a lot of wild game to survive. I've raised all of the animals on that chart at one point or another and hunted the wild versions. A twelve year old goose as an average is a ridiculous notion.." On top of being an avid hunter, eagle scout, rancher, and conservationist I have a minor degree in wildlife management from Texas A&M. oops

  • [-]
  • Cheese_Bits
  • -1 Points
  • 17:41:39, 11 December

Im sure, and I have a degree from mars university and a letter of recognition from Pope Pious...

Doesn't disprove the simple fact you're wilfully ignoring, which is an animal in the wild lives far longer on average than livestock. But you keep dismissing that, it's not like it was what we were talking about or anything...

More Comments - Not Stored
  • [-]
  • TheBloodening
  • 0 Points
  • 17:21:06, 11 December

I've taken as much wildlife to eat as livestock raised. I'm from VERY rural parts of the US. Actually had venison for years before ever having beef. Not an expert just someone who's had to take a lot of wild game to survive. I've raised all of the animals on that chart at one point or another and hunted the wild versions. A twelve year old goose as an average is a ridiculous notion..

  • [-]
  • limbodog
  • 4 Points
  • 17:38:11, 11 December

Ok, I'm willing to believe a vegan-sourced infographic may be stretching the truth. But it seems to me that even if we take that into account, the numbers still indicate a wild animal greatly outlives it's farmed counterparts on average.

  • [-]
  • TheBloodening
  • 2 Points
  • 17:45:46, 11 December

Sure, no argument there. With industry meat its a law of diminishing returns that makes for the shorter lives. There's a few vegetables that have similar lifespan and edibility curves. Mind you with animals the older meat is still good but not as market desirable. Ethics of animal lifespan opportunity is another discussion.

  • [-]
  • suninabox
  • 1 Points
  • 17:29:03, 11 December

There are plenty of animals that don't have predators and have plentiful access to food.

Also 100% of the animals in the food industry wouldn't exist in the first place if it wasn't for humans specifically breeding them to be used/killed for food.

  • [-]
  • weazelhall
  • 0 Points
  • 13:47:45, 11 December

What about tortoises?

  • [-]
  • unscanable
  • 4 Points
  • 12:21:25, 11 December

Its sad that you would make this assertion with 0 evidence but even sadder that you have been upvoted and given gold.

  • [-]
  • verycinematic
  • 1 Points
  • 14:08:52, 11 December

And even more sad that you were downvoted for pointing this out! Have an upvote. FFS, what is wrong with people.

  • [-]
  • probablycallsyoudumb
  • 1 Points
  • 16:19:55, 11 December

it's nice living in america you can afford to not abuse your animals

  • [-]
  • nubylishious
  • 1 Points
  • 17:34:42, 11 December

I posted a link on a full documentary on this issue

  • [-]
  • sefy98
  • 1 Points
  • 17:54:16, 11 December

I hate that this video gets branded with a product. The practices of the farm have nothing to do with the practices of a pizza company.

  • [-]
  • ExtremelyOffensive
  • 1 Points
  • 18:17:06, 11 December

That's pretty true, not as true for the dairy industry, though. Obviously it still occurs as this video shows, but good dairy producers (in the U.S. at least) treat their cows much better because their milk quality is regulated and effects their price as well as the performance of the cows. Doesn't justify it at all, but it's a small consolation I like to think.

  • [-]
  • KodaThePony
  • 1 Points
  • 19:27:21, 11 December

I'd say 99% is a bit of an understatement.

  • [-]
  • scartrek
  • -4 Points
  • 11:39:34, 11 December

Too bad there isn't enough protein in beans and rice otherwise i would consider becoming a vegitarian.

  • [-]
  • RomanCavalry
  • 1 Points
  • 13:50:06, 11 December

Just buy local.

  • [-]
  • HulkingBrute
  • 1 Points
  • 12:47:12, 11 December

I hope that was sarcasm

  • [-]
  • divadsci
  • 2 Points
  • 13:52:16, 11 December

HulkingBrute knows.

  • [-]
  • scartrek
  • 0 Points
  • 13:49:25, 11 December

It wasn't vegtable boy.

  • [-]
  • HulkingBrute
  • 2 Points
  • 14:20:23, 11 December

Beans arent a vegetable...?

  • [-]
  • flammable
  • 0 Points
  • 14:09:49, 11 December

There are lots of vegan bodybuilders, and I powerlifted the whole summer on a vegetarian diet without any problems. If you somehow require so much protein that a vegetarian diet will not provide you enough, then you are probably doing something very very wrong

  • [-]
  • scartrek
  • 0 Points
  • 14:59:22, 11 December

No there's not, No you didn't..

  • [-]
  • flammable
  • 1 Points
  • 15:22:15, 11 December

k

  • [-]
  • moparornocar
  • 1 Points
  • 16:03:55, 11 December

There actually is a large community of vegan bodybuilders, a Google search just came up with loads of forums and such. So that is def a thing that happens.

  • [-]
  • scartrek
  • 1 Points
  • 16:07:46, 11 December

I'll bet they lift 50 LBS and probably weight only 90LBS.

  • [-]
  • HoradricNoob
  • -1 Points
  • 13:13:50, 11 December

I always have assumed this, but never would I have thought that the animals get stabbed like prison-bitches just to vent some psychos' rage problems.

  • [-]
  • TightAssHole234
  • -1 Points
  • 13:56:34, 11 December

Are you short and brutish too? Maybe you should join a BDSM club, silly sir.

  • [-]
  • _rs
  • -2 Points
  • 14:18:16, 11 December

The lives of 99% of the animals is short and brutish. Nature is cruel...

  • [-]
  • verycinematic
  • 0 Points
  • 14:04:47, 11 December

This is not the case if you take care over the food you buy. I buy meat from my local butcher who only sells free-range and/or organic products. He has long-standing, close relationships with all of the farms that supply him.

I understand the point you're trying to make, but I disagree 100% with you. If you put in a little effort you can improve things a lot.

  • [-]
  • limbodog
  • 1 Points
  • 16:32:51, 11 December

That was my point. "Know your farmer"

  • [-]
  • verycinematic
  • 1 Points
  • 17:18:42, 11 December

I don't know any farmers.

  • [-]
  • ImBaked
  • 0 Points
  • 14:12:04, 11 December

Cows got it going on. they got milk to make delicious shit and they are made of delicious meat. Stupid god damn cows should not taste so good. long live mcdonalds

  • [-]
  • Pirispanen
  • -1 Points
  • 12:46:39, 11 December

Maybe in the States...

  • [-]
  • Bebealex
  • -1 Points
  • 13:56:06, 11 December

Espacially when they sit on your BMW.

  • [-]
  • bobbechk
  • -1 Points
  • 14:15:24, 11 December

Oh what's that? Ribeye for half the regular price?!

Surely this animal must have been treated so well that the owners decided to bless us customers with a bargain as the final respect towards the animal!

  • [-]
  • Cureno
  • -1 Points
  • 15:27:48, 11 December

these cows are really not being eaten.