This is what happens when you don't test your code. (i.imgur.com)

{techsupportgore}

407 ups - 72 downs = 335 votes

122 comments submitted at 04:13:43 on Mar 2, 2013 by toastee

  • [-]
  • toastee
  • 71 Points
  • 04:52:48, 2 March

That's far too nice a term. Fucking useless piece of over-educated shit, might fit better.

  • [-]
  • wolf550e
  • 4 Points
  • 17:48:17, 2 March

Actual education in engineering would have taught him the importance of safety and of following procedure.

  • [-]
  • terriblestoryteller
  • 2 Points
  • 18:27:07, 2 March

Don't hold back Toastee, tell us how you really feel. :)

  • [-]
  • hokiepride
  • 10 Points
  • 12:52:48, 2 March

I'm sorry, over-educated? Are you suggesting that furthering one's education somehow contributes to events like this?

  • [-]
  • tyrroi
  • 76 Points
  • 14:45:57, 2 March

"I'm so intelligent i don't need to check it because i'm always right. "

  • [-]
  • hokiepride
  • -18 Points
  • 14:54:28, 2 March

That is a gross generalization. I have never met anyone with a Master's level education or higher act as though they didn't need to check after their own work. Conscientiousness does not go away as people increase in education.

  • [-]
  • ravkal
  • 19 Points
  • 15:03:59, 2 March

That sounds like exactly what happened

  • [-]
  • hokiepride
  • -13 Points
  • 15:07:54, 2 March

Hence the phrase "gross generalization". Taking a few instances and generalizing the behaviors to the whole group.

  • [-]
  • Chakote
  • 15 Points
  • 16:23:08, 2 March

Are you still here? He didn't generalize anything - he didn't even mention any whole group of people, he just said the one individual guy was "over-educated", and you started slinging false accusations about how he said everyone with an education lacks conscientiousness.

You've already lost - stop trying to save face and just admit you're full of shit.

  • [-]
  • hokiepride
  • -10 Points
  • 17:19:10, 2 March

... what? You responded an hour after my last post.

  • [-]
  • ravkal
  • 6 Points
  • 15:44:36, 2 March

I don't think they were applying it to the whole group.

  • [-]
  • dghughes
  • 1 Points
  • 17:43:01, 2 March

> Hence the phrase "gross generalization". Taking a few instances and generalizing the behaviors to the whole group.

Sort of like this:

> "I have never met anyone ..."

  • [-]
  • toastee
  • 19 Points
  • 15:12:15, 2 March

More that too much theory without any practical knowledge of how it's applied leads to arrogance, and makes certain people useless. I support education.

  • [-]
  • hokiepride
  • -12 Points
  • 15:21:16, 2 March

It is the "leads to arrogance" part that is getting to me. I can't find a single scientific study that supports such a notion. I was hoping I could use the MIDUS dataset to shed some light on the relationship between education level and conscientiousness, but unfortunately they didn't include any Big 5 scales of personality so I can't run that.

Do you know of any social theory that supports the claim? I always hate relying on anecdotal evidence, because it is prone to confirmation bias. Stereotypes such as many women putting on makeup while driving arise from seeing it happen a few times and recalling those instances but not the MANY more in which it didn't occur.

I posit that there are arrogant people at all levels of education, and that it stands out more in higher educated individuals, but that the education level itself doesn't lead to the arrogant behaviors/attitude. It'd be an interesting study if it hasn't already been done, because of the role of conscientiousness in predicting workplace performance and citizenship behaviors in the workplace (Barrick & Mount, 1991).

Edit: Full disclosure; there is a disconnect between academics and practitioners in my field, and I am trying to straddle the gap.

  • [-]
  • toastee
  • 11 Points
  • 15:29:47, 2 March

I work with a lot of educated people, and PHDs and PHD candidates are the group that I personally find a lot of arrogant people in.

I don't need a scientific study to form that opinion.

In industry the number of letters a person has after their name is inversely proportional to their usefulness.

I find This is especially true in IT with Microsoft certified staff. I've met plenty of people with multiple MS & Cisco certs that couldn't find an ON switch with both hands and a instruction book.

Edit: PS, have an upvote.

  • [-]
  • hokiepride
  • 0 Points
  • 15:34:23, 2 March

And I'm suggesting that the actions of a few are generalized to the whole in this situation and others where stereotypes hold. I'm sorry that you've had to deal with arrogant individuals; I certainly do my best to treat everyone the same as I have come from a factory where I was treated like dirt (by people without degrees in higher positions, for what it is worth).

Edit: Have an upvote yourself!

  • [-]
  • MrJacoste
  • 2 Points
  • 15:20:11, 2 March

It does contribute to a false sense of superiority and an over-inflated ego. The real world be different from the class rooms yo.

  • [-]
  • cookrw1989
  • 2 Points
  • 15:57:50, 2 March

I graduated with a BS in Mechanical Engineering, and I don't have a sense of superiority or ego... Knowledge is incredibly useful, but it can't ever replace experience and skill in the workplace.

  • [-]
  • MrJacoste
  • 1 Points
  • 17:09:00, 2 March

BS != Masters

I think it is actually GETTING you masters that does this. Most people in higher education fields are expected to get their BS as a baseline, but only the higher ups are expected to have their Masters. This is where the false sense of superiority and an over-inflated ego come from. Not always, but it definitely does happen.

  • [-]
  • hokiepride
  • 2 Points
  • 15:24:43, 2 March

See my response to toastee. I think that the "ego" issue in educated individuals is overplayed as result of confirmation bias (though I can't find a scientific source to argue either side).

  • [-]
  • daniell61
  • -59 Points
  • 05:45:45, 2 March

ಠ_ಠ im 15 in two weeks and could probably program better...

  • [-]
  • toastee
  • 12 Points
  • 05:54:31, 2 March

yeah, well you're not a fresh off the boat chinese PHD student in canada so you kinda have an advantage. The guys that are most useful at that research facility are college grads that the PHD's look down on. It's actually kind of hilarious.

  • [-]
  • gambitKGB
  • 10 Points
  • 10:22:36, 2 March

Reminds me of a Foreign student from my college in the Professional Pilot Program. On his last solo before getting his CFII license, and the day before graduation, he landed a Beechcraft Baron with the gear up.

His excuse? He didn't understand the "gear up" voice yelling at him in his headset.

He graduated, passed the followup check ride and solo (both with FAA representatives in the aircraft) and is now a commercial pilot in his home country.

  • [-]
  • jackoman03
  • 5 Points
  • 12:59:41, 2 March

Ruined the props and left a nice big gash on the fuselage I assume? If you fly an English aircraft, LEARN FUCKING ENGLISH.

  • [-]
  • gambitKGB
  • 4 Points
  • 13:36:25, 2 March

Props were toast, but there was surprisingly little damage to the airframe. It was back in the air by the start of the fall semester.

  • [-]
  • D1RTYBACON
  • 2 Points
  • 14:39:40, 2 March

Not to sound overly ignorant, but I was under the understanding that all pilots and tower controllers spoke English.

  • [-]
  • hanbush
  • 1 Points
  • 14:49:06, 2 March

might want to be careful with your choice of words there, incompetence by an individual does not call for racism in return

  • [-]
  • toastee
  • 5 Points
  • 15:17:54, 2 March

There are lots of great Chinese staff at that facility. "fresh off the boat" simply means someone not yet familiar with the local language and customs. Following safety procedures, is one of those customs he hadn't picked up yet.

  • [-]
  • hanbush
  • -1 Points
  • 15:36:05, 2 March

I'm quite familiar with the term. It's degrading. Also, do you really think safety is a "local" custom? Why can't someone be incompetent just for being incompetent? I'm not sure why you have to bring race or immigrant status into this.

  • [-]
  • toastee
  • 4 Points
  • 15:41:49, 2 March

In Canada our industry and government are damn near safety obsessed, in china not so much.
example of chinese industrial safety Would you prefer the term "fucking newb?"

  • [-]
  • hanbush
  • -1 Points
  • 15:58:56, 2 March

Thats the equivalent of linking to a rap video to defend a generalization about all black people. Really man? China also has some of the most advanced manufacturing and r&d facilities in the world, but to be honest, I probably have more bones to pick with China than you do, but there's a way to do it without being racially insensitive.

  • [-]
  • toastee
  • 2 Points
  • 16:13:22, 2 March

China also has rampant problems with corruption and rumours of slave labour. The country is making great strides to fix this kind of thing, but it's not there yet. I'm going to take that to mean that you do prefer the term "fucking newb" to fresh off the boat.

  • [-]
  • hanbush
  • 0 Points
  • 16:16:03, 2 March

very much so. fresh off the boat implies illegal immigration via container ship, an experience i would not wish on my worst enemy.

  • [-]
  • daniell61
  • -3 Points
  • 12:24:56, 2 March

oh.....