Let's Talk About Thin Privilege (everydayfeminism.com)

95 ups - 59 downs = 36 votes

101 comments submitted at 21:02:40 on Nov 20, 2013 by LesSoldats

  • [-]
  • aufleur
  • 25 Points
  • 02:01:39, 21 November

can we not find body acceptance without having a war between bodies?

solidarity to all my sisters and brothers out there searching for it.

but seeking happiness and acceptance yourself and understanding that everyone is seeking the same, and then doing something to inhibit their self discovery of happiness and acceptance–means you'll never find it yourself.

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -4 Points
  • 02:16:18, 21 November

I feel like maybe you should read this awesome comment from the person who submitted this article.

But in case you don't want to click the link let me copy and paste it for you.

I actually thought this would be a bridge-building article because over half the piece addresses such concerns. It's very careful to emphasize that they are not minimizing the issues people with thin bodies face and to talk about how awful it is to be shamed for being thin. I'll paste that portion; warning: it's long.

>But Thin People Can Hate Their Bodies

>I made a video this summer called ‘How to Get a Bikini Body.’ It repeated the oft-seen-on-social-media body-positive mantra “Put a bikini on your body!” theme.

>And people were quick to comment that my message lost its meaning because my body adheres to societal beauty standards. “Easy for you to say,” they said.

>And this pissed me off.

>Because I wanted to be like, “Well, thin people can hate their bodies, too, ya know! Just because you think it’s ‘perfect’ doesn’t mean that I don’t struggle with it!”

>But then I realized that they were right.

>Because here’s the thing: Can a thin person have body image struggles? Can a thin person be at war with their self-image? Can a thin person hate to look in the mirror?

>Absolutely.

>And does that suck?

>Absolutely.

>But the difference between these negative feelings and fatphobia is this: The only person worrying about whether or not I’m meeting beauty standards is me.

>And that’s not the same for fat folk.

>When you’re not thin, other people on the beach actually do take offense. When you’re not thin, people really do think that you shouldn’t be in a bathing suit. When you’re not thin, people really do make your body their moral obligation.

>And while your internal struggle is real and significant, the point is: You might hate your body, but society doesn’t.

>That’s thin privilege.

>But—But—But—Skinny-Shaming!

>Before you worry that I’m going to disregard or otherwise undermine the bullying involved in skinny-shaming, let me reassure you: I’m not going to do that.

>Let me address here and now (and loudly) that no one should ever be shamed for their body. I believe whole-heartedly that the body-positive community needs to be open to all body types. And absolutely, it is problematic that people engage in making fun of thin bodies.

>I would never tell you that jabs at your “chicken legs” or insinuations (or outright proclamations) that you must have an eating disorder aren’t hurtful or that their effects aren’t far-reaching.

>Because they are.

>But what I am going to argue is this: As horrible as skinny-shaming is (and it is!), what makes it different is that it does not involve a pervasive fear or hatred of thin bodies.

>And while its personal effects are certainly influential, it is not restrictive on a social level.

>Let me be clear on two theories that explain how skinny-shaming is fundamentally different from fat-shaming:

>1. Skinny-Shaming as a Response to Fat-Shaming

>Have you ever heard the supposed-to-be-empowering phrase “Real Women Have Curves?” What about the cringe-worthy assertion that “Only Dogs Want Bones?”

>Thin people aren’t really crazy about these. Obviously.

>Real women are such because they identify as women, curves or not. And referring to someone’s partner as a dog just because they like someone’s body is degrading. Right?

>Right.

>But these types of reclamations of fat pride wouldn’t need to exist if fat-shaming wasn’t a thing.

>These types of phrases and attitudes were born of a need to say “I’m beautiful, too!” They’re responses to social norms.

>And while you can argue that they’re misguided, they’re actually challenging fatphobia.

>And while you certainly shouldn’t encourage them if they feel like put-downs, what you need to remember about these phrases, in the words of Lindy West is, “’I’m proud to be fat’ is still a radical statement. ‘I’m proud to be thin’ is the status quo.’”

>2. Skinny-Shaming as Rooted in Sexism

>It’s absolutely true that regardless of what our bodies look like, society polices them.

>And that’s because patriarchal structures benefit from this policing.

>And arguably, skinny-shaming is rooted in this type of sexism.

>Society wants you to recognize that being thin is “in” – but not too thin, not that thin – because the goal is to keep you insecure.

>Take a look at any tabloid cover.

>The “So-and-So Has Cellulite!” headline is right next to the “Does So-and-So Have an Eating Disorder?” story.

>And they both convey the same message: “Ew! Gross!”

>For fuck’s sake, we just can’t win.

>And not to go all conspiracy theory on you, but that’s exactly what they want.

>They (and you can insert anyone you want here for “they” – society, the media, the dieting industry, the executive board for Patriarchy, Inc.) want women to continue to chase after unattainable goals.

>But the difference is that the discrimination that fat people experience is at the intersection of sexism and fatphobia.

>That is, there’s another layer to it.

>So while, yes, shaming anyone is wrong and bad and sexist, fat-shaming is rooted in extra factors that skinny-shaming is not.

>So they’re not the same.

>Well, I Have an Eating Disorder, So ‘Privilege’ Doesn’t Apply to Me

>The blog This Is Thin Privilege details, “When we explain that thin privilege exists despite eating-disordered status, we’ve had thin people with [eating disorders] take offense.”

>And I get why that is.

>Because having an eating disorder is serious.

>And when you feel trapped in and controlled by your body, when you’ve reached that level of self-consciousness, when you’re suffering every single day just to make it through, it’s unlikely that you’ll feel like you’re experiencing privilege.

>Because an eating disorder feels like a curse.

>But, as This Is Thin Privilege explains, “I think it’s important to note that disability is its own underprivileged status, and in this case, thin people with [eating disorders] are conflating the oppression they feel for lacking able-bodied privilege with a negation of their thin privilege.”

>That is: The marginalization that you experience as a person living with an eating disorder is a result of the disorder, not a result of your body.

>You experience illness. You experience stigma. You experience symptoms and effects of your disorder.

>But that doesn’t negate your thin privilege.

>A Man of Color can experience racism and still benefit from his male privilege. An able-bodied woman can experience sexism and still benefit from her able-bodied privilege. A poor white farmer can experience classism and still benefit from his white privilege.

>A person with an eating disorder can experience ableism and still benefit from their thin privilege.

>Being marginalized in one area doesn’t negate your privilege in another.

  • [-]
  • aufleur
  • 2 Points
  • 04:20:30, 21 November

I reddit, er, readit... my issue is that while the blog makes some great points, it's formatted with a poor angle.

  • [-]
  • anmbia
  • 12 Points
  • 08:30:01, 21 November

I'm not a fan of the term thin privilege. It shifts focus back to thin people, and makes it seem like they are doing something wrong by taking advantage of that privilege. Thin people are not in control of the privileges society gives them, just like how fat people are not in control of fat shame. I'd argue that thin people are not aware that any privileges exist, especially since a lot of the so called privileges are just an absence of the fat shaming heavier people experience.

  • [-]
  • genderwar
  • 19 Points
  • 12:38:16, 21 November

No one chooses their privilege but that doesn't mean it isn't real. White privilege is the absence of race related prejudice, male privilege is the absence of sexism. Privilege is not someone's fault. It's something bestowed upon someone by society, whether they want it or not.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 6 Points
  • 16:01:55, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • genderwar
  • -2 Points
  • 22:45:19, 21 November

But they (we) receive the privilege whether we want it or not. And that's something important to be aware of.

  • [-]
  • sirMouse
  • 0 Points
  • 07:14:38, 21 November

No matter what the author says, there is a certain point of thinness where a level of oppression occurs. Maybe it's not to the same extent as a fat person, but someone who is 5'4 and 125 is not the same as someone the same height but 40 pounds lighter.

Thin privilege, real or not, extends to those only within the 'normal' range of thinness. People who are excessively thin are subject to very similar struggles to those who are overweight. Clothes do not fit, people point and stare, and they are barred from many every day things due to societal pressures.

I don't want to get into a debate about this, the article is obviously written from a place of positivity, but I feel like it's ignorant to assume that a minority isn't oppressed just because it may not be the MOST oppressed. Thin privilege may or may not be real, but there is a level of person thinner still that certainly loses that privilege altogether.

Really we should be struggling for body positivity regardless of size, not letting the size of others create divisions and foster hostility.

  • [-]
  • i_lick_telephones
  • 5 Points
  • 07:58:29, 21 November

Really extreme example, and one I'm sure won't be well-received, but it's kind of like male rape. Doesn't happen nearly as often as rape committed against females. They are definitely in the minority. It's also expected that men should "like it" (cuz guys like sex hur hur). Kind of like how you should be "thankful" for being thin because that's the "good" body type to be. Men don't feel like they can speak up about their rape because of this. Women who try to say they are also oppressed because of her skinny body are told it's not as bad as the struggle of fat people, so they don't speak up. That means there's a whole another level of oppression going on here.

We need to teach rape is bad. All rape is horrible. Unconsensual sex committed by anyone against anyone is intolerable. No matter the relationship, occasion, whatever. Same with body-shaming. All of it is horrible. By anyone, against anyone. None of it should be tolerated. We need to live in a society where people can speak up if something is wrong and not hush themselves because they're in the minority or because they are expected to like the position they're in. It's not fair to anyone.

  • [-]
  • disneyaddict
  • 2 Points
  • 16:55:06, 21 November

Exactly. I'm 5'2 and 85-90 lbs and I get treated much differently from a girl who is 5'2, still thin, but 110-115lbs. There is a range, and people who happen to not fall into this "general range of thin/thickness", get labeled into one group or the other. I think the problem has always been society picking and choosing what's attractive and acceptable and what's not-that's the real issue.

  • [-]
  • LesSoldats
  • 0 Points
  • 17:31:58, 21 November

Here comes FCJ to troll, brigade and downvote the thread.

Yeah, how 'bout them Reddit rules?

I'm sad that I predicted this in this very thread and I apologize if it was a Candyman effect.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 0 Points
  • 15:30:33, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • curious_electric
  • 6 Points
  • 17:06:01, 21 November

We're getting the BANNNED back together.

  • [-]
  • KaitlinAuditore
  • 0 Points
  • 16:35:55, 21 November

I'm an overweight female who barely eats anything at all and works full time in a warehouse lifting heavy boxes and doing vigorous physical work. I still maintain my 5'4, 180lb frame. Don't tell me it's as simple as you're saying it is, because it's not. I was skinny until I hit puberty and I've been a big girl ever since. Sometimes it's just genetics. Each body is different and has its own threshold for weight. Mine happens to be in the 170-210lb range. It's people like you, MassivePenis, that contribute to the idea that everyone's body is the same.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 4 Points
  • 23:33:25, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • KaitlinAuditore
  • 3 Points
  • 00:11:31, 22 November

I don't look 180, I look about 160. I think the 180 number comes from muscle mass because I'm fairly muscular from my job.

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • 1 Points
  • 01:53:29, 22 November

Just a heads up we're having kind of a troll problem, as you can see by all of the deleted posts and down votes. Don't feel like you have to respond to them when you can just hit the report button or send us a mod mail.

  • [-]
  • mostlyandie
  • 4 Points
  • 16:56:29, 21 November

What the hell? Why are there so many trolls in this subreddit?

Why can't there be a place for people who want to talk about body acceptance in the same way that there is a place for trans people to talk and share like /r/transpositive? I honestly expected many trolls there but it is exactly what it claims to be: a positive place for trans people.

This subreddit is called BodyACCEPTANCE and the rules are pretty clear. If you don't agree then don't come here. If you think being fat is something you can control and you don't want to be fat then don't. Live your life that way but please leave the rest of us alone to discuss these things.

Is the root problem the moderators? Is it that people don't report the trolls? Is it that the trolls are targeting this group disproportionately? If so, why? I fear that the root problem is that this group feels this vitriol is just the way things are or maybe even deserved. I hope I am wrong but I do fear that.

If the group wants to invite interactions like this, that is also fine but that's not what I signed up for. I want to support other people (of all sizes) and be supported and I believe that's what this group stands for. Am I wrong?

  • [-]
  • KaitlinAuditore
  • 5 Points
  • 17:01:26, 21 November

Did you mean to reply to MassivePenis or myself?

And I agree. I'm always kind of hesitant to post here for that reason alone, but I have a thick skin and an anonymous man on the internet calling me fat isn't going to make me sad.

It's people like him, (trolling or not) that really piss me off because they think that "JUST PUT THE FORK DOWN YOU'LL LOSE WEIGHT LOL" is a good response. I've been told the same thing for years and guess what, I'm still a big girl. I have a boyfriend of 6 years who loves me and my body for what it is, and I have amazing friends who couldn't give a single shit what my body type is. So whatever.

  • [-]
  • mostlyandie
  • 2 Points
  • 17:06:21, 21 November

I wasn't sure where to put that comment, thanks for checking in with me. Mainly, I thought you and others reading your replies would be up for a common sense discussion or consideration. I have a pretty good idea of what MassivePenis thinks.

Speaking of user names, are you related to Ezio. ;)

  • [-]
  • KaitlinAuditore
  • 2 Points
  • 17:09:44, 21 November

If your name is Warren Vidic, I have no idea who you're talking about please don't kidnap me I don't do well in confined spaces.

  • [-]
  • mostlyandie
  • 2 Points
  • 17:14:40, 21 November

Psh! A hoopy frood like me could never be a Templar!

  • [-]
  • curious_electric
  • 6 Points
  • 17:25:43, 21 November

> What the hell? Why are there so many trolls in this subreddit?

There are several other subreddits which regularly link to this subreddit and invade. We do what we can as soon as we can but they pile on pretty fast. Reporting shitty posts is very helpful.

  • [-]
  • mostlyandie
  • 3 Points
  • 17:54:31, 21 November

Ah! Thank you for explaining that.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • -1 Points
  • 16:50:20, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • KaitlinAuditore
  • 0 Points
  • 16:52:12, 21 November

Okay because clearly you know more about me, a complete stranger on the internet, than I do, right? Get off your high horse.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • -1 Points
  • 16:53:11, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • mostlyandie
  • 4 Points
  • 16:59:24, 21 November

You cannot possibly know this person's situation.

Stop.

  • [-]
  • KaitlinAuditore
  • 1 Points
  • 16:55:18, 21 November

k then

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • -5 Points
  • 21:45:19, 20 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • Eldarn
  • -1 Points
  • 23:08:02, 20 November

well if a shit is $10 in "standard size" 16 but the same shirt in "plus size" 18 is $40, you'd be pissed off too

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 2 Points
  • 01:55:12, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • Eldarn
  • 1 Points
  • 02:18:03, 21 November

not $30 more

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • -1 Points
  • 06:30:22, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • meantforamazing
  • 2 Points
  • 06:44:52, 21 November

Did you read the article?

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -97 Points
  • 00:05:08, 21 November

Oh hey guys. If you don't believe in thin privilege your post is gonna get removed. This is not the place to have that debate.

Waitin for my downvotes

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 32 Points
  • 04:37:49, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -14 Points
  • 11:45:48, 21 November

> Well, I Have an Eating Disorder, So ‘Privilege’ Doesn’t Apply to Me > > > > The blog This Is Thin Privilege details, “When we explain that thin privilege exists despite eating-disordered status, we’ve had thin people with [eating disorders] take offense.” > > > > And I get why that is. > > > > Because having an eating disorder is serious. > > > > And when you feel trapped in and controlled by your body, when you’ve reached that level of self-consciousness, when you’re suffering every single day just to make it through, it’s unlikely that you’ll feel like you’re experiencing privilege. > > > > Because an eating disorder feels like a curse. > > > > But, as This Is Thin Privilege explains, “I think it’s important to note that disability is its own underprivileged status, and in this case, thin people with [eating disorders] are conflating the oppression they feel for lacking able-bodied privilege with a negation of their thin privilege.” > > > > That is: The marginalization that you experience as a person living with an eating disorder is a result of the disorder, not a result of your body. > > > > You experience illness. You experience stigma. You experience symptoms and effects of your disorder. > > > > But that doesn’t negate your thin privilege. > > > > A Man of Color can experience racism and still benefit from his male privilege. An able-bodied woman can experience sexism and still benefit from her able-bodied privilege. A poor white farmer can experience classism and still benefit from his white privilege. > > > > A person with an eating disorder can experience ableism and still benefit from their thin privilege. > > > > Being marginalized in one area doesn’t negate your privilege in another.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 30 Points
  • 00:11:33, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 21 Points
  • 01:42:36, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • LesSoldats
  • 5 Points
  • 01:45:40, 21 November

I actually thought this would be a bridge-building article because over half the piece addresses such concerns. It's very careful to emphasize that they are not minimizing the issues people with thin bodies face and to talk about how awful it is to be shamed for being thin. I'll paste that portion; warning: it's long.

>But Thin People Can Hate Their Bodies

>I made a video this summer called ‘How to Get a Bikini Body.’ It repeated the oft-seen-on-social-media body-positive mantra “Put a bikini on your body!” theme.

>And people were quick to comment that my message lost its meaning because my body adheres to societal beauty standards. “Easy for you to say,” they said.

>And this pissed me off.

>Because I wanted to be like, “Well, thin people can hate their bodies, too, ya know! Just because you think it’s ‘perfect’ doesn’t mean that I don’t struggle with it!”

>But then I realized that they were right.

>Because here’s the thing: Can a thin person have body image struggles? Can a thin person be at war with their self-image? Can a thin person hate to look in the mirror?

>Absolutely.

>And does that suck?

>Absolutely.

>But the difference between these negative feelings and fatphobia is this: The only person worrying about whether or not I’m meeting beauty standards is me.

>And that’s not the same for fat folk.

>When you’re not thin, other people on the beach actually do take offense. When you’re not thin, people really do think that you shouldn’t be in a bathing suit. When you’re not thin, people really do make your body their moral obligation.

>And while your internal struggle is real and significant, the point is: You might hate your body, but society doesn’t.

>That’s thin privilege.

>But—But—But—Skinny-Shaming!

>Before you worry that I’m going to disregard or otherwise undermine the bullying involved in skinny-shaming, let me reassure you: I’m not going to do that.

>Let me address here and now (and loudly) that no one should ever be shamed for their body. I believe whole-heartedly that the body-positive community needs to be open to all body types. And absolutely, it is problematic that people engage in making fun of thin bodies.

>I would never tell you that jabs at your “chicken legs” or insinuations (or outright proclamations) that you must have an eating disorder aren’t hurtful or that their effects aren’t far-reaching.

>Because they are.

>But what I am going to argue is this: As horrible as skinny-shaming is (and it is!), what makes it different is that it does not involve a pervasive fear or hatred of thin bodies.

>And while its personal effects are certainly influential, it is not restrictive on a social level.

>Let me be clear on two theories that explain how skinny-shaming is fundamentally different from fat-shaming:

>1. Skinny-Shaming as a Response to Fat-Shaming

>Have you ever heard the supposed-to-be-empowering phrase “Real Women Have Curves?” What about the cringe-worthy assertion that “Only Dogs Want Bones?”

>Thin people aren’t really crazy about these. Obviously.

>Real women are such because they identify as women, curves or not. And referring to someone’s partner as a dog just because they like someone’s body is degrading. Right?

>Right.

>But these types of reclamations of fat pride wouldn’t need to exist if fat-shaming wasn’t a thing.

>These types of phrases and attitudes were born of a need to say “I’m beautiful, too!” They’re responses to social norms.

>And while you can argue that they’re misguided, they’re actually challenging fatphobia.

>And while you certainly shouldn’t encourage them if they feel like put-downs, what you need to remember about these phrases, in the words of Lindy West is, “’I’m proud to be fat’ is still a radical statement. ‘I’m proud to be thin’ is the status quo.’”

>2. Skinny-Shaming as Rooted in Sexism

>It’s absolutely true that regardless of what our bodies look like, society polices them.

>And that’s because patriarchal structures benefit from this policing.

>And arguably, skinny-shaming is rooted in this type of sexism.

>Society wants you to recognize that being thin is “in” – but not too thin, not that thin – because the goal is to keep you insecure.

>Take a look at any tabloid cover.

>The “So-and-So Has Cellulite!” headline is right next to the “Does So-and-So Have an Eating Disorder?” story.

>And they both convey the same message: “Ew! Gross!”

>For fuck’s sake, we just can’t win.

>And not to go all conspiracy theory on you, but that’s exactly what they want.

>They (and you can insert anyone you want here for “they” – society, the media, the dieting industry, the executive board for Patriarchy, Inc.) want women to continue to chase after unattainable goals.

>But the difference is that the discrimination that fat people experience is at the intersection of sexism and fatphobia.

>That is, there’s another layer to it.

>So while, yes, shaming anyone is wrong and bad and sexist, fat-shaming is rooted in extra factors that skinny-shaming is not.

>So they’re not the same.

>Well, I Have an Eating Disorder, So ‘Privilege’ Doesn’t Apply to Me

>The blog This Is Thin Privilege details, “When we explain that thin privilege exists despite eating-disordered status, we’ve had thin people with [eating disorders] take offense.”

>And I get why that is.

>Because having an eating disorder is serious.

>And when you feel trapped in and controlled by your body, when you’ve reached that level of self-consciousness, when you’re suffering every single day just to make it through, it’s unlikely that you’ll feel like you’re experiencing privilege.

>Because an eating disorder feels like a curse.

>But, as This Is Thin Privilege explains, “I think it’s important to note that disability is its own underprivileged status, and in this case, thin people with [eating disorders] are conflating the oppression they feel for lacking able-bodied privilege with a negation of their thin privilege.”

>That is: The marginalization that you experience as a person living with an eating disorder is a result of the disorder, not a result of your body.

>You experience illness. You experience stigma. You experience symptoms and effects of your disorder.

>But that doesn’t negate your thin privilege.

>A Man of Color can experience racism and still benefit from his male privilege. An able-bodied woman can experience sexism and still benefit from her able-bodied privilege. A poor white farmer can experience classism and still benefit from his white privilege.

>A person with an eating disorder can experience ableism and still benefit from their thin privilege.

>Being marginalized in one area doesn’t negate your privilege in another.

  • [-]
  • disneyaddict
  • 3 Points
  • 01:53:05, 21 November

I agreed with that portion of the article, I think that it's more complicated than what we make it out to be (that article did acknowledge), which was the part I disagreed with. Perhaps it's because I feel that by using the term "privilege"-it already evokes certain feelings because there are already stigmas already to them. I personally feel that each person experiences life differently because each person is unique and simply saying that one person falls under a 'privilege' labels them-and I believe that labels tend to cause all people (not just specific groups) to promote stigmas that already exist.

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -27 Points
  • 00:30:46, 21 November

No. Nothing in that post is saying thin is wrong, or that thin people need to change. Also from your removed comment it would seem as if you didn't even read the article you saw the words thin privilege and got your heckles up sooo

Let's expand on that shall we?

"What is thin privilege?"

"If you don’t know what the social justice concept of ‘privilege’ means more generally, then please read this first it's a PDF)

Thin privilege systematically reduces each of us to our dress size, hip measurement, and waist size, then grants favors, opportunities, or simple lack of punishment when the numbers are low enough.

When you have thin privilege it doesn’t mean that your individual experience of being thin is necessarily positive, or that you haven’t been called names or discriminated against. It also doesn’t mean that every single fat person feels stigma as keenly as another. Some fat people might have grown up with supportive families in supportive environments and never encountered the kinds of fat stigma other people encounter.

Thin privilege is a social phenomenon that exists as a function of fat stigma, and it exists regardless of someone’s personal experience being thin or fat. Fat stigma is real, pervasive, and forceful. It invades entertainment, science, news reporting, advertising, sports, business, family planning (like adoption and fertility treatments and being called an abusive parent by virtue of you or your child being fat), education, dating/love/sex/marriage, fiction, travel, academia…. and on and on and on.

Stigma and privilege exist regardless of whether we, personally, experience them. And though I’m sorry thin people get shit for their weight — that’s wrong, and contemptible — it doesn’t obviate thin privilege or fat stigma.

Further, thin privilege is not about eating disorders. ‘Thin’ is the social state of thinness, the state of being seen and/or physically accepted as not fat. There is no consideration here why someone is fat or not fat.

Thin privilege exists no matter how it’s ‘won,’ no matter whether the thin person wants privilege or not, no matter how much a fat person wishes they had access to those privileges as a result of their own good behavior, character, or health."

That being said this subreddit operates under the idea that privilege in the world... exists. Male privilege, white privilege, able privilege, and so on. Up to and including thin privilege. If you would like to go to other subreddits and argue with them about what kind of privilege you feel does real, and what doesn't feel free. But you WILL NOT be doing it here.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 9 Points
  • 00:39:41, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -29 Points
  • 00:47:49, 21 November

Great non-apology.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 9 Points
  • 00:49:31, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -21 Points
  • 00:52:03, 21 November

It was pretty much a verbatim example of the non-apology.

An example of a non-apology apology would be saying "I'm sorry that you feel that way" to someone who has been offended by a statement. This apology does not admit that there was anything wrong with the remarks made, and additionally, it may be taken as insinuating that the person taking offense was excessively thin-skinned or irrational in taking offense at the remarks in the first place.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 13 Points
  • 08:01:43, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -15 Points
  • 11:53:34, 21 November

Everywhere else on reddit?

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 15 Points
  • 01:46:28, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -22 Points
  • 02:10:22, 21 November

People have all the rest of reddit to debate this. /r/askHAES to debate this. Or any of the other SJ101 subreddits to debate this. It doesn't happen here, and it will not happen here.

Oh and no one here or anywhere else in the world owes you health.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 16 Points
  • 02:24:44, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • LesSoldats
  • 9 Points
  • 02:57:59, 21 November

I agree wholeheartedly, and that's why I'm dismayed that there is so much opposition to the respectful, tolerant discourse presented in the topic of this thread. It's a fascinating topic, but we can't get anywhere because people keep trying to censor us into not talking about it.

Rather than have the discussion, we're having to argue about whether we have the right to have the discussion in the first place. :/

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 9 Points
  • 03:28:37, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • LesSoldats
  • 0 Points
  • 13:35:45, 21 November

From this comment, I'm not sure you've read the article we're talking about. Over half of it was devoted to explicitly acknowledging that no matter what a person experiences, their body image struggles are just as real and just as justified.

If you could set aside reflexive anger for a moment, we might be able to talk about the topic, which as I see it is how societal oppression of fat people in general privileges nonfat people in general, no matter what each person personally experiences.

Conversations like this are valuable to have, because recognizing axes of oppression are a crucial step in freeing both oppressed and privileged alike from its pressures. If society didn't demonize large bodies and worship small bodies (in women), not only would fat women be no longer oppressed (harassed, assaulted, abused, and discriminated against for being fat) but so too thin women would no longer receive negative comments about their bodies stemming from their perceived lack of meeting the same ideal.

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -13 Points
  • 04:01:25, 21 November

Your numerous insightful link submissions, ^( it ^looks ^like ^exactly ^zero ^from ^your ^history... ^weird),

Don't forget all of those super insightful comments in other people's threads. Which look to be exclusively ^in^^this^^thread will surely be missed.

  • [-]
  • disneyaddict
  • 5 Points
  • 04:26:18, 21 November

Their link karma is above 100 and their link karma is also like 3,000....^weird, eh?

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -4 Points
  • 11:49:20, 21 November

And that concerns how active they have been in this subreddit how exactly?

  • [-]
  • disneyaddict
  • 1 Points
  • 16:44:39, 21 November

Because it means that while obviously this subreddit isn't where they are normally active-they probably have actively read posts on this subreddit. You cannot say that someone is "not active" because they do not actively post onto the subreddit or comment on it regularly. I'm "active" on many subreddits that I have never commented or posted on.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 4 Points
  • 08:17:52, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -3 Points
  • 11:50:54, 21 November

Things are easier for people who are thin. Is this their choice? No.

Do they still (often) suffer from body image issues? Of course.

Do their body image issues cancel the privilege they get from society in general? No.

Do you see people on this subreddit talking shit about people of any size? You shouldn't, if you do report it.

Can thin people here post about their body issues? Of course they can.

Can fat (or anything else) people get all up in that thread and tell them that their body image issues don't real? Fuck no

But the idea that thin people get treated better than fat people by society is not up for debate here. Full stop, and will be removed. This is a place for acceptance not debate. If you want to have a debate go take it else where.

We are often bombarded with the "ideal," and the vast majority of both women and men, do not measure up, regardless of their weight. We all suffer from a lack of perfection and comparison to genetic rarities and we all deserve to feel good about ourselves and comfortable in our skin.

We welcome bodies of all shapes, sizes, abilities, and disabilities. We are about accepting yourself right now, as you are.

Some hard and fast rules:

Any abusive behavior towards any poster will not be tolerated. This includes a general rule of respect and civility.

No weight-shaming.

No advocating diets, no trash talking of bodies or negative comments about any bodies, and no telling anyone what they should eat or how they should exercise. These are personal decisions, and it is absolutely not acceptable to push them on others. (Important note: For the purposes of this space "diet" refers to a pattern of eating with the goal of weight loss or weight gain. Discussions of eating patterns for overall health or recovery from disordered eating are allowed. You can be on a weight loss/gain diet if you want to, but you just can't talk about it here. There are a thousand other places on the internet for that. This isn't one of them.)

Posts violating these policies will be removed.

Any questions, comments, or suggestions regarding this subreddit may be directed to the moderators.

If you see anything that does not follow the rules listed above, please click the report button.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 9 Points
  • 05:02:08, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 6 Points
  • 08:05:51, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 3 Points
  • 15:29:00, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -5 Points
  • 11:52:11, 21 November

Sorry to see you go. Good luck in your new subreddit.

  • [-]
  • LesSoldats
  • 2 Points
  • 13:44:47, 21 November

This and subreddits like this are under constant siege — links and downvote brigades — from people who don't like the idea of body acceptance. In r/AskHAES, I am routinely downvoted heavily into the negatives for simply posting respected scientific studies or for pointing out that eating healthily doesn't automatically equate to eating at a caloric deficit. (If it did, we'd all die!)

So it's never safe to assume where votes come from. I've tracked patterns over in that other subreddit and I know the traffic comes from circlejerk subreddits devoted to hating fat people (one of them is even called that). I wouldn't be surprised if the same populations visited here to downvote as well.

As an aside, does anyone know how to get admin attention on such behavior? I had been led to understand that brigading/invading other subreddits was against the rules.

  • [-]
  • polkadotgirl
  • 2 Points
  • 15:29:45, 21 November

That's a good point. I definitely will keep that in mind.

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -2 Points
  • 22:41:13, 21 November

You have to message the mods over on /r/reddit.com they are the admins.

Good luck!

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -4 Points
  • 11:51:43, 21 November

Good luck! Really. Maybe you can join over on /r/swoleacceptance?

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -13 Points
  • 02:32:58, 21 November

Yes, all people suffer from body image issues.

Things are easier for people who are thin. Is this their choice? No. Do they stull (often) suffer from body image issues? Of course. Do their body image issues cancel the privilege they get from society in general? No.

Do you see people on this subreddit talking shit about people of any size? You shouldn't, if you do report it.

Can thin people here post about their body issues? Of course they can.

Can fat (or anything else) people get all up in that thread and tell them that their body image issues don't real? Fuck no

But the idea that thin people get treated better than fat people by society is not up for debate here. Full stop, and will be removed. This is a place for acceptance not debate. If you want to have a debate go take it else where.

We are often bombarded with the "ideal," and the vast majority of both women and men, do not measure up, regardless of their weight. We all suffer from a lack of perfection and comparison to genetic rarities and we all deserve to feel good about ourselves and comfortable in our skin.

We welcome bodies of all shapes, sizes, abilities, and disabilities. We are about accepting yourself right now, as you are.

Some hard and fast rules:

Any abusive behavior towards any poster will not be tolerated. This includes a general rule of respect and civility.

No weight-shaming.

No advocating diets, no trash talking of bodies or negative comments about any bodies, and no telling anyone what they should eat or how they should exercise. These are personal decisions, and it is absolutely not acceptable to push them on others. (Important note: For the purposes of this space "diet" refers to a pattern of eating with the goal of weight loss or weight gain. Discussions of eating patterns for overall health or recovery from disordered eating are allowed. You can be on a weight loss/gain diet if you want to, but you just can't talk about it here. There are a thousand other places on the internet for that. This isn't one of them.)

Posts violating these policies will be removed.

Any questions, comments, or suggestions regarding this subreddit may be directed to the moderators.

If you see anything that does not follow the rules listed above, please click the report button.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 8 Points
  • 05:28:49, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -5 Points
  • 11:52:21, 21 November

Cute.

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 0 Points
  • 13:36:41, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • Megapope
  • -2 Points
  • 11:15:30, 21 November

Thankyou.

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -23 Points
  • 02:17:55, 21 November

There they are!

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 20 Points
  • 05:42:57, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • [deleted]
  • 9 Points
  • 08:07:47, 21 November

[deleted]

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -17 Points
  • 11:52:53, 21 November

Yeah, cause we don't have 5 or so subs that like to come over here and troll. Fuck me, right?

  • [-]
  • curious_electric
  • -9 Points
  • 17:11:51, 21 November

OK, when the mod says "X is not up for debate" and y'all respond with a huge subthread debating whether or not "X is not up for debate" should be up for debate, I delete those posts.

  • [-]
  • PlaidCoat
  • -3 Points
  • 22:35:41, 21 November

I love when people report mod posts.